Building Ministry Teams that L.A.S.T.

$12.95

Building Ministry Teams that L.A.S.T. explores and defines four hallmark practices that are foundational for creating and sustaining effective team work. Written from a ministry context, these principles have application across the board, and can help make the dream of team a reality.

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Most people intuitively agree that when skilled practitioners (each with their own level of expertise) cooperate, things work “better” than if a leader tries to go it alone. We’d also readily admit that the old “command and control” management approach is ultimately ineffective when attempting to fully engage knowledgeable staff and customers.

Therefore, the idea of doing work in teams makes sense. That is why team-building books and seminars are hot. Yet, after the dust has settled, the conferences are attended, and the books read, it seems that much has remained the same. People may use the vocabulary of team, but groups’ and organizations’ behavior hasn’t really changed.

Why is that? Is it that people aren’t really convinced of the benefits? Is that leaders are reluctant to relinquish control? Is it that staff members aren’t willing to engage?

Perhaps.

However, there may be a more fundamental issue at stake. For all the talk about the theory behind team, and for all the hope that team-building conversation has stimulated, there are still many people who are still not sure what it takes to create a highly-functioning team. How is a team different from a committee? How is a team different than a department? What are the interpersonal dynamics that distinguish great teams from other groupings of people?

This book explores and defines four hallmark practices that are foundational for creating and sustaining effective team work. Written from a ministry context, these principles have application across the board, and can help make the dream of team a reality.